Wednesday, January 2, 2008

Diversity, Part I

I love visiting the University of Hawaii at Manoa campus. Diversity abounds: the buildings, the languages, the people & their skin colors, and the plant life. Each step along every path brings something new and amazing.

For instance, this Coral Tree simply took my breath away. I stopped to photograph it, and a gentleman on campus stopped to query me. "What purpose is there in taking pictures of flowers?" He asked.



"Purpose?" I parroted and shrugged. "I just thought they were pretty."

"Pretty is not important." He flicked his hand like he was brushing away dust.

"But look at them," I pointed and said. "The shape --. The texture --. The amazing color --."



"Listen," he said. "If you want to see something truly amazing you need to study mathematics."

"But numbers aren't very photogenic." I replied.



He looked at me quizzically, shook his head and walked away. I was shaking my head as I watched him go.

Diversity.


Erythrina crista-galli, Fabaceae, common coral tree, origin, Brazil.

Zosterope japonicus japonicus, Zosteropidae, Mejiros or Japanese White Eye, named for the ring of white around it's eyes, is a song bird from Japan.

Diversity.

5 Comments:

Nea said...

What use is there is taking pictures of pretty flowers.........that just shows you how different we are.......I love pictures of flowers....as you know. Pictures of numbers.??? Pictures of math?? I don't even like math, and it truly isn't very photogenic, now is it.......unless it is numbers of flowers. haha

Nea said...

I don't mean how different you and I are, how different the math guy and I are....well I am sure you know what i meant, I hope you did. I often am NOT very clear....

Pacific Quilly said...

It's okay, Nea. I knew what you meant. I even thought of posting a photo that was distinct enough that I could number the blossoms and do "math".

Nea said...

haha....this is truly a gorgeous plant. But there isn't much that grows in Hawaii that would survive here, I had so many plants in Garden Grove that won't live here, but in Garden Grove it never got below 40 degrees. tonight here it is 14.degrees....I moved a few things here that I am not sure will make it if it gets much colder. I have the Clivia covered. They grew so beautiful in Calif. Here it is a struggle to keep them alive. I think next year, if they make it, I will pot them and bring them inside. But the don't bloom as well unless they get really pot bound. I remember Grandma getting so excited when her clivia would bloom. And in Garden Grove I had clustered three feet across.

Pacific Quilly said...

Nea, take them ALL inside. Your husband can sleep in the yard and see how he likes not being watered. And what can the city do? You aren't watering your yard!

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